Business for Peace Award
1557, Section: Report

Report

According to residents and humanitarian aid workers, some schools in Amran remain occupied by militants, while others were looted and remain empty. (Ali Ibrahim Al-Moshki)

Amran’s youth struggle for education

Published on 11 September 2014 by Madiha Al-Junaid in Report

It has been more than a month since President Abdu Rabu Mansour Hadi visited Amran governorate on July 23, officially declaring the governorate to be back under government control.

The fear of AQAP attacks causes severe psychological distress among soldiers which often goes untreated.

Attacks leave soldiers traumatized

Published on 9 September 2014 by Ali Abulohoom in Report

A Defense Ministry campaign is ongoing to “lift soldiers’ spirits,” but many say the government is not doing enough to keep soldiers and security personnel safe and provide mental health support.

Yemeni women fight for greater representation

Published on 8 September 2014 by aljazeera.com / First published Sept. 2 in Report

After years of activism, Amal Basha’s demands for guarantees of greater representation for women in the political system has finally edged closer to reality.

On-duty soldiers regularly leave their posts to buy qat while in uniform‭, ‬violating a number of orders‭. ‬Here‭, ‬a soldier chews while a bag of qat hangs from the turret he is manning‭.

Ignoring the ban

Published on 8 September 2014 by Nasser Al-Sakkaf in Report

Soldiers in uniform leave their posts to buy qat, chew while on duty

In late April 2007, former Minister of Interior Rashad Al-Alimi issued a ministerial directive forbidding the widespread habit of army personnel wearing their uniforms in qat markets and chewing qat while on duty.

A model created by the Youth Cultural Forum of the cave in Marran Mountain, Sa’ada, where Hussein Al-Houthi took refuge at the beginning of the war in 2004. It was here that on Sept. 10, 2004, government forces launched an assault, capturing and subsequen

This article has photo galleryThe Houthis: From a local group to a national power

Published on 4 September 2014 by Ali Ibrahim Al-Moshki in Report

Starting their movement in Marran district of Sa’ada governorate, the Houthis are now in control of two entire governorates: Sa'ada and Amran. Trying to expand their dominance in the entire north of Yemen, the Houthis are currently launching massive demonstrations in the capital Sana’a calling for the toppling of the government.

Photo by Volker Mantel

This article has photo galleryPolitics of Qat by Peer Gatter: Qat and the political uprising

Published on 4 September 2014 by Nadia Al-Sakkaf in Report

The cover page shows an old man with an apprehensive look in his eyes, half-smiling as he hands you a bunch of qat leaves. In the background there is a wild-eyed teenage boy, cheeks swollen from the qat that fills them, peering into the camera.

This 862 page hard-cover book published by Reichert Publications is a weapon in all senses of the word. Besides documenting the ever growing role qat plays in Yemen and in the life of Yemenis, the book also analyses Yemen’s qat policy, the tribal qat economy, and the qat connections of our decision makers.

I had this huge publication lying by my bedside for months before I summoned the courage to pick it up and start reading. This was not only due to its intimidating size, but probably even more so due to its topic. Qat, and the political and economic schemes around it, were to me as a Yemeni always a well-known problem. I just was too afraid to read for myself and acknowledge how I as a citizen am part of a society that enables this culture of qat.

I don’t chew Qat and personally I am ardently opposed to it. But I live in a society where Qat prevails. After years of research, Peer Gatter, the author of  this book, published it in 2012, offering to the world an insight into this drug and what it has done to my country. Gatter was working for many years for the World Bank and UNDP in Yemen and is now heading the Integrated Expert Program for Afghanistan of the German Development Cooperation (GIZ-CIM).

To read more about the book go to www.qat-yemen.com

Welcomed art and a “modern look” or unwelcomed political propaganda which threatens Sana’a’s centuries-old cultural heritage?  The painting of Houthi slogans in Sana’a’s old city center causes a great deal of controversy among residents.

Whose old Sana’a?

Published on 2 September 2014 by Mohammad Al-Khayat in Report

The politicization of Sana’a’s urban space has become a prominent feature in Houthi activism. While protest camps inside Yemen’s capital have recently begun to make headlines, Sana’a’s old city center has long been witnessing an increased display of Houthis’ political symbols.

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is common in populations impacted by drone strikes, with children being the hardest hit. (Reuters)

Drone stricken families hit by PTSD

Published on 2 September 2014 by Ali Abulohoom in Report

There is no end in sight for the drone strikes carried out in Marib, Abyan, Shabwa, Al-Bayda, Hadramout, and Dhamar governorates. In fact, it is said that the number of civilian casualties is still on the rise. In most cases the repercussions to families affected by the unmanned planes go beyond the loss of lives, often leaving them clueless, traumatized, and desperate for answers.

Ibrahim Mothana

In memory of one of Yemen’s greatest youths: Ibrahim Mothana

Published on 2 September 2014 by Luai Ahmad in Report

Luai Ahmad is a 20-year-old Yemeni who studies development studies at Lund University, Sweden.

Free qat handouts secure a high voter turnout in Yemen's elections.

Politics of Qat by Peer Gatter: The long awaited conference on qat-2002

Published on 28 August 2014 by Nadia Al-Sakkaf in Report

The cover page shows an old man with an apprehensive look in his eyes, half-smiling as he hands you a bunch of qat leaves. In the background there is a wild-eyed teenage boy, cheeks swollen from the qat that fills them, peering into the camera.

This 862 page hard-cover book published by Reichert Publications is a weapon in all senses of the word. Besides documenting the ever growing role qat plays in Yemen and in the life of Yemenis, the book also analyses Yemen’s qat policy, the tribal qat economy, and the qat connections of our decision makers.

I had this huge publication lying by my bedside for months before I summoned the courage to pick it up and start reading. This was not only due to its intimidating size, but probably even more so due to its topic. Qat, and the political and economic schemes around it, were to me as a Yemeni always a well-known problem. I just was too afraid to read for myself and acknowledge how I as a citizen am part of a society that enables this culture of qat.

I don’t chew Qat and personally I am ardently opposed to it. But I live in a society where Qat prevails. After years of research, Peer Gatter, the author of  this book, published it in 2012, offering to the world an insight into this drug and what it has done to my country. Gatter was working for many years for the World Bank and UNDP in Yemen and is now heading the Integrated Expert Program for Afghanistan of the German Development Cooperation (GIZ-CIM).

To read more about the book go to  www.qat-yemen.com

ADVERTISMENT