Business for Peace Award
1543, Section: Report

Report

Welcomed art and a “modern look” or unwelcomed political propaganda which threatens Sana’a’s centuries-old cultural heritage?  The painting of Houthi slogans in Sana’a’s old city center causes a great deal of controversy among residents.

Whose old Sana’a?

Published on 2 September 2014 by Mohammad Al-Khayat in Report

The politicization of Sana’a’s urban space has become a prominent feature in Houthi activism. While protest camps inside Yemen’s capital have recently begun to make headlines, Sana’a’s old city center has long been witnessing an increased display of Houthis’ political symbols.

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is common in populations impacted by drone strikes, with children being the hardest hit. (Reuters)

Drone stricken families hit by PTSD

Published on 2 September 2014 by Ali Abulohoom in Report

There is no end in sight for the drone strikes carried out in Marib, Abyan, Shabwa, Al-Bayda, Hadramout, and Dhamar governorates. In fact, it is said that the number of civilian casualties is still on the rise. In most cases the repercussions to families affected by the unmanned planes go beyond the loss of lives, often leaving them clueless, traumatized, and desperate for answers.

Ibrahim Mothana

In memory of one of Yemen’s greatest youths: Ibrahim Mothana

Published on 2 September 2014 by Luai Ahmad in Report

Luai Ahmad is a 20-year-old Yemeni who studies development studies at Lund University, Sweden.

Free qat handouts secure a high voter turnout in Yemen's elections.

Politics of Qat by Peer Gatter: The long awaited conference on qat-2002

Published on 28 August 2014 by Nadia Al-Sakkaf in Report

The cover page shows an old man with an apprehensive look in his eyes, half-smiling as he hands you a bunch of qat leaves. In the background there is a wild-eyed teenage boy, cheeks swollen from the qat that fills them, peering into the camera.

This 862 page hard-cover book published by Reichert Publications is a weapon in all senses of the word. Besides documenting the ever growing role qat plays in Yemen and in the life of Yemenis, the book also analyses Yemen’s qat policy, the tribal qat economy, and the qat connections of our decision makers.

I had this huge publication lying by my bedside for months before I summoned the courage to pick it up and start reading. This was not only due to its intimidating size, but probably even more so due to its topic. Qat, and the political and economic schemes around it, were to me as a Yemeni always a well-known problem. I just was too afraid to read for myself and acknowledge how I as a citizen am part of a society that enables this culture of qat.

I don’t chew Qat and personally I am ardently opposed to it. But I live in a society where Qat prevails. After years of research, Peer Gatter, the author of  this book, published it in 2012, offering to the world an insight into this drug and what it has done to my country. Gatter was working for many years for the World Bank and UNDP in Yemen and is now heading the Integrated Expert Program for Afghanistan of the German Development Cooperation (GIZ-CIM).

To read more about the book go to  www.qat-yemen.com

This article has photo galleryTaking Yemen from bad to worse

Published on 31 August 2014 by Ali Ibrahim Al-Moshki in Report

Yemen has witnessed eight dreadful months, during which it has undergone significant changes .Many citizens consider these changes to have led the country into further decline. Earlier, citizens were feeling hopeful for this year, thinking it would be different from the years following the 2011 uprising. As demands for a better life have gone unrealized, hopes for a better future disappeared.

Illegally tapping into electricity lines comes at a great risk‭: ‬Every day cases of injuries or deaths caused by electrical shocks are registered at Sana'ani hospitals‭. ‬

Illegal neighborhoods in Sana’a lack public services

Published on 28 August 2014 by Ali Ibrahim Al-Moshki in Report

Around 35,000 households in Sana’a obtain electricity illegally

Given the high rent and costly land in Sana’a, many residents build illegal houses on the outskirts of the capital.

Ahmed Ubaid Bin Daghr, minister of telecommunications and information technology, in a meeting with the Internet Society-Yemen  and a delegation from ICANN and RIPE.

Introducing Internet governance to Yemen

Published on 26 August 2014 by Ali Saeed in Report

For a long time, the citizens of Yemen have battled with a lack of accessible communications.

In reaction to fuel subsidy cuts and increased transportation costs an increasing‭  ‬number of young Yemeni men use bicycles‭.              ‬

Yemenis seek energy and transport alternatives

Published on 26 August 2014 by Bassam Al-Khameri in Report

With the difficult economic situation plaguing Yemen, including a debt of more than six billion dollars, Yemenis are trying to find transport and energy alternatives in order to save money.

Without sufficient support and oversight from the government‭, ‬popular committees in Abyan‭, ‬which act as quasi-police forces‭, ‬often go unchecked‭. ‬

The popular committees of Abyan

Published on 26 August 2014 by Nasser Al-Sakkaf in Report

Nearly four years after being formed, the committees continue to fulfill a range of duties in place of the government


In the wake of increasing attacks on military forces and government headquarters by Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) in 2011, popular committees mobilized in governorates like Shabwa and Abyan to end AQAP’s predominance there.

The government-run Al-Thawra Al-Iqtisadi newspaper denounces the loss of‭

Politics of Qat by Peer Gatter: Ups and downs in qat politics after 2002 (part 2/2)

Published on 21 August 2014 by Nadia Al-Sakkaf in Report

The cover page shows an old man with an apprehensive look in his eyes, half-smiling as he hands you a bunch of qat leaves. In the background there is a wild-eyed teenage boy, cheeks swollen from the qat that fills them, peering into the camera.

This 862 page hard-cover book published by Reichert Publications is a weapon in all senses of the word. Besides documenting the ever growing role qat plays in Yemen and in the life of Yemenis, the book also analyses Yemen’s qat policy, the tribal qat economy, and the qat connections of our decision makers.

I had this huge publication lying by my bedside for months before I summoned the courage to pick it up and start reading. This was not only due to its intimidating size, but probably even more so due to its topic. Qat, and the political and economic schemes around it, were to me as a Yemeni always a well-known problem. I just was too afraid to read for myself and acknowledge how I as a citizen am part of a society that enables this culture of qat.

I don’t chew Qat and personally I am ardently opposed to it. But I live in a society where Qat prevails. After years of research, Peer Gatter, the author of  this book, published it in 2012, offering to the world an insight into this drug and what it has done to my country. Gatter was working for many years for the World Bank and UNDP in Yemen and is now heading the Integrated Expert Program for Afghanistan of the German Development Cooperation (GIZ-CIM).

To read more about the book go to www.qat-yemen.com

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